Plotting San Diego Streetlights

Plotting San Diego Streetlights

Plotting San Diego Street Lights

 The Challenge

After writing a series of stories about San Diego city infrastructure, Voice of San Diego reporter Liam Dillon turned his attention to street lamps. Although the city published GIS data for the locations of street lamps, Liam wanted to understand how the number of lamps varied by community.

 

The Solution

Working through our non profit project, the San Diego Regional Data Library, we computed small-area areal densities of street lamps and aggregated the densities by San Diego community, allowing Liam to tell a compelling story about where San Diegans are in the dark

( Photo: Visualization created by Voice of San Diego from map image provided by The San Diego Regional Data Library. )

Crime Vizualizations

Crime Vizualizations

Crime Visualizations and Public Record Requests

The Problem

San Diego area residents had an impoverished view of crime in their city; the official crime maps only showed a few weeks of incidents, and the local statistics covered entire neighborhoods, neglecting to consider the difference in time of day or commercial crime versus residential crime. Worse, the data that could answer these questions were not available, and the agency that controlled the data responded to requests either with refusals or quotes of very high fees.

 

 The Solution

Over the course of six months and 50 emails, we negotiated with the agency that held the crime data, eventually getting 6 years of data for a fee of $134. Then, working though our non profit project, the San Diego Regional Data Library, we led volunteers in visualization projects to produce time series and heat maps, allowing citizens to understand how crime incidents vary with time of day and fine grained locations. Then, we posted the datasets and visualizations publically as a resource for many subsequent local and national research projects.

HMDA Summary Reports

HMDA Summary Reports

 

HMDA Summary Reports

 

The Challenge

The San Diego Housing Commission reviews data reports from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act to ensure that San Diego area lenders are following the law. When they wanted to reduce costs of processing the data into summary reports, they turned to Civic Knowledge for help.

 The Solution

Because we had already loaded HMDA data into our data warehouse, we could quickly produce the required reports,  and because all of the work was done using Python and IPython notebook, the reports will be repeatable in future years, for an even lower cost.

Tracking Development Services Performance

Tracking Development Services Performance

Tracking City Department Performance

Andy Keatts, a reporter for Voice of San Diego, had been working for months with the City’s Development Services Department to release hundreds of thousands of development permit records, but working with XML data  was beyond a reporter’s typical skill set. Civic Knowledge extracted the records from the City’s API and converted the XML records to CSV files. After extracting the data, a Civic Knowledge analyst worked closely with Andy to explore the dataset and find the story, resulting in a series of five stories.

( Photo: Analysis by Damon Crocket. )

Street Sweeping

Street Sweeping

Analyze Street Sweeping GPS Data

Project Description

When Wendy Fry, a reporter with NBC 7 San Diego, requested data for a story about street sweeping, the city sent her a dump from their dispatch system’s GPS logs, a dozen files with several million records. Civic Knowledge, working under its nonprofit San Diego Regional Data Library, processed the records to determine which streets had been swept. By merging the reduced data with records of traffic tickets, we determined where residents had been ticketed for parking on a street that was not swept, to support a series of NBC 7 stories and television segments.

( Photo: Screenshot of NBC 7 web story based on data provided by the San Diego Regional Data Library . )